There’s a new warning about counterfeit iPhone chargers after an investigation found that 99% of them failed a basic safety test. 

According to the new report from UL, an Illinois-based safety consulting and certification company, counterfeits aren’t designed to meet industry safety standards and lack the safety features to protect users from danger.

Fake iPhone chargers have 99% failure rate 

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In a test of 400 counterfeit iPhone adapters, all but three failed basic safety tests and were considered “fire and shock hazards.” In fact, UL said that 12 of the adapters posed a risk of lethal electrocution. 

Since the iPhone is so popular, there’s naturally going to be a demand for spare accessories, including chargers. Smartphone adapters from legitimate suppliers usually sell for around $20. But some of the knock-offs cost as little as a dollar, which should be the first red flag.

How to spot a fake

So how else can you spot a fake? It’s becoming harder to tell. A clear sign is the absence of a certification mark, such as a UL mark. However, some suppliers are putting counterfeit certification marks on the products, making it even more difficult for consumers to tell whether the adapter is legitimate or a fake. 

4 ways to identify a counterfeit iPhone adapter

  • Color: All genuine UL certified Apple adapters are white.
  • Printed text: Look for spelling mistakes or grammatical errors.
  • Price: Genuine Apple iPhone adapters retail for $19. Beware of an unusually low price.
  • Packaging: Genuine Apple adapters come in white Apple packaging and aren’t sold loose in bins.

Genuine iPhone adapter 

Warning: Do not buy these iPhone chargers

What you need to know 

The bottom line is that you don’t want to risk injuring yourself or damaging your device by purchasing a counterfeit iPhone adapter, which really only saves you a few bucks in the first place. 

Your best bet is to purchase a UL certified adapter manufactured by Apple or a legitimate source.

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