As we near the deadline for tax filing, the scamsters are out and about in full force to try to catch you off guard and steal your tax refund. 

Read more: Beware of these common IRS scams

The Washington Post reported recently that scammers pretending to be the IRS are using email to try to gain access to your wallet. 

"This tax season in particular, some scam artists may try to take advantage of the fact that tax authorities and tax software companies are sometimes requesting more information from taxpayers to confirm their identities before issuing a refund," they said.

Phishing and malware had increased by over 400% by mid February according to the IRS, and thieves are increasingly adept at making the emails look official -- exactly like a tax preparer or the IRS. But the IRS will never email you to verify your information. 

What to do if you receive an email from "the IRS":

  • Don't click on any links or respond to the email.
  • Note that official correspondence from the IRS comes via U.S. mail only.
  • You can forward any suspicious-looking email to [email protected]
 

More ways to avoid IRS scams

In addition, you might want to check out these resources to help you avoid any other IRS scams this tax season.